My publishing journey – how to promote your book

As promised, here’s another update on my journey to publication.  Really I should be talking about the illustration process, but as that’s still happening (and very exciting it is too), I’ll write another post about that when I can give you… wait for it… the whole picture.  Sorry about that.

With five or six months to go before publication day and not much that I can contribute to the text at this time, it’s a good time to start thinking about promotion.  Fortunately my publisher Maverick held an author’s day last week where we discussed that exact topic.  The timing could not have been better, and I’m now buzzing with ideas of how I can promote my book.  So here are the main points I picked up.  I hope they’re useful to you too.

  • No one can force you to go out there and promote your book, but it helps a huge amount.    The publisher will promote you using social media, press releases, presentations to buyers etc, but only you can produce the author in person. You have nothing to lose but some spare time and possibly your dignity.
  • There are basically four types of author visits you can do: library visits, school visits, bookshop visits and events.
  • Libraries are very welcoming to authors.  Library visits are likely to be around an hour and may consist of a reading, a short activity and book signing.  You should be able to sell copies of your book directly to the public.  Also check with the library that they do actually have your book for loan.  If not, prompt them!  Summer holidays are a good time for parents looking for activities.
  • Be brave and walk into your local bookshop.  Introduce yourself and ask if you could come and do a book signing session.  This is often a good way to get your books into bookshops that wouldn’t normally stock you.  For example, Waterstones only order centrally but they are allowed to support local authors.  The bookshop will then order in stock from the wholesalers (Betrams and Gardners are the two big companies). Be proactive and offer an activity or a reading rather than just a ‘buy my book’ approach.  Mention the visit to local press and radio beforehand.
  • You can contact local primary schools directly by emailing their Literary or Key Stage One leader.  Make it easy for them by providing e-posters and flyers.  You can also include a form that allows parents to pre-order signed copies of the book, to be collected on the day.  The school should have a budget for author visits and you will be expected to charge.  You can find guidelines on how much at the Society of Authors website.  They also have a useful pdf about author visits.  You no longer need to be CRB checked (these days DBS checked) to visit schools as long as there is a teacher in the classroom at all times.  However you will probably find that having an up-to-date DBS check makes your approach look more professional.  And it’s very useful to have a teacher present at all times anyway!  You can get a DBS check and insurance through the National Association of Writers in Education at www.nawe.co.uk.
  • Events can range from school fetes to county fairs to literary festivals and radio station visits.  Think laterally and try to find a connection between your book and the local area or event. You can buy copies of your own book at a good discount and resell them.  Add value by signing and personalising the books.
  • There are various directories of authors you can join if you want to be contacted about a visit, such as contactanauthor.co.uk.
  • When you’ve read your book out, what else can you do to keep your young listeners entertained?  Thanks to author Alex English for sharing this resource on 103 things to do after reading a picture book.  And don’t be desk bound – children love songs, rhymes, games and dressing up, so think about the content of your book and how you can transfer this into some educational playtime!

Right, I’m off to buy a lab coat, four pairs of glasses and a big bag of props.  Author visits may be nerve-wracking but they sound like they can be a lot of fun, too!

Professor McQuark and the Oojamaflip will be published by Maverick Books in January 2016.

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10 responses to “My publishing journey – how to promote your book

  1. Thanks for not being economic with those tips! And I hope your new book sales show the elasticity of demand and supply they deserve.

  2. Useful stuff indeed. I think that thinking laterally and also going with the flow and enjoying it are the best tips of all. Good luck!

  3. ThanksLouReallyusefulLookingforwardtoyourtipsforIllustratorsSueRosserxx

  4. LouThis all sounds so exciting!  I took a look at the Maverick site – they look a fab bunch of people to be working with, plus their lovely dogs.  Will be buying your book as soon as it’s out.  Very best of luck with it. Debbie

  5. I would imagine that as well as a means of promoting your published book, a school visit could provide some great inspiration for your next one.

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